Stephen Leacock, Sherlock Holmes, Boobies

The Improbable Adventures of Sherlock Holmes: edited by John Joseph Adams (2009), containing the following stories:

The Doctor’s Case (1987) by Stephen King;
The Horror of the Many Faces (2003) by Tim Lebbon;
The Case of the Bloodless Sock  (2001) by Anne Perry;
The Adventure of the Other Detective  (2001) by Bradley H. Sinor;
A Scandal in Montreal (2008) by Edward D. Hoch;
The Adventure of the Field Theorems (1995) by Vonda N. McIntyre;
The Adventure of the Death-Fetch (1994) by Darrell Schweitzer;
The Shocking Affair of the Dutch Steamship Friesland (2005) by Mary Robinette Kowal;
The Adventure of the Mummy’s Curse (2006) by H. Paul Jeffers;
The Things That Shall Come Upon Them (2008) by Barbara Roden;
Murder to Music (1989)   by Anthony Burgess;
The Adventure of the Inertial Adjustor  (1997) by Stephen Baxter;
Mrs Hudson’s Case (1997) by Laurie R. King;
The Singular Habits of Wasps (1994) by Geoffrey A. Landis;
The Affair of the 46th Birthday (2008) by Amy Myers;
The Specter of Tullyfane Abbey (2001) by Peter Tremayne;
The Vale of the White Horse (2003) by Sharyn McCrumb;
The Adventure of the Dorset Street Lodger (1995) by Michael Moorcock;
The Adventure of the Lost World (2004) by Dominic Green;
The Adventure of the Antiquarian’s Niece (2003) by Barbara Hambly;
Dynamics of a Hanging (2005) by Tony Pi;
Merridew of Abominable Memory (2008)  by Chris Roberson;
Commonplaces (2008) by Naomi Novik;
The Adventure of the Pirates of Devil’s Cape (2008) by Rob Rogers;
The Adventure of the Green Skull (2008) by Mark Valentine;
The Human Mystery (1999) by Tanith Lee;
A Study in Emerald (2003) by Neil Gaiman;
You See But You Do Not Observe (1995) by Robert J. Sawyer.

Hugely entertaining and lengthy anthology, mostly consisting of reprints, of Sherlock Holmes stories from the two decades previous to the anthology’s publication. Many of the stories involve either science fiction or the supernatural, hence the ‘improbable’ part of the title. That itself riffs on Holmes’ famous quotation, “When you have eliminated the impossible, whatever remains, no matter how improbable, is the truth.”

Some stories expand upon brief mentions of unchronicled cases in the original Holmes stories by Arthur Conan Doyle (“Merridew of Abominable Memory” by Chris Roberson and “The Shocking Affair of the Dutch Steamship Friesland” by Mary Robinette Kowal both reference the original mention in their titles). Others pit Holmes against the supernatural (“The Horror of the Many Faces” by Tim Lebbon, “The Adventure of the Antiquarian’s Niece” by Barbara Hambly, and “A Study in Emerald” (2003) by Neil Gaiman memorably riff on H.P. Lovecraft’s brand of cosmic horror).

Writers also bounce Holmes off the works and characters of other writers (“The Things That Shall Come Upon Them” by Barbara Roden puts Holmes into a sequel of sorts to the classic M.R. James ghost story “Casting the Runes”) or Doyle’s own non-Holmesian works (“The Adventure of the Lost World” (2004) by Dominic Green). Mrs. Hudson and Doctor Watson get chances to solve crimes before Holmes does. Alternate worlds and science-fictional devices appear. Conan Doyle himself appears as a character. Holmes’ childhood and college years are speculated upon, as is his family history. He even teams up with Stephen Leacock! In Canada!

There are a few duds here, but very few. One doesn’t need to be a Holmes expert to enjoy the stories, and a concise history of Holmes included in the volume will aid those with too little knowledge of the World’s First Consulting Detective. Highly recommended.

The Witchcraft Reader: edited by Peter Haining (1969) containing the following stories: Timothy (1966) by Keith Roberts; The Witch (1943) by A. E. van Vogt; The Warlock (1960) by Fritz Leiber; All the Devils in Hell  (1960) by John Brunner; From Shadowed Places (1960) by Richard Matheson; One Foot and the Grave (1949) by Theodore Sturgeon; Broomstick Ride (1957) by Robert Bloch; The Mad Wizards of Mars (1949) by Ray Bradbury.

Another of the voluminous Haining’s fascinating anthologies. At his peak, he seemed to be releasing one of these a week. OK, he wasn’t THAT prolific. Still, his selections are often immensely valuable because they’re often way, way off the beaten path for this sort of thing.

The best character study here is John Brunner’s  “All the Devils in Hell .” It’s a marvelous exploration of a man in conflict with occult powers that ultimately can be opposed. Fritz Leiber’s story puts a modern spin on witchcraft, while Robert Bloch’s story deals with ancient witchcraft during a future era of interstellar travel. It’s a solid little anthology. Also, there are naked boobies on the cover of the paperback. Huzzah! Recommended.

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